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Detection of rotavirus by a latex agglutination test, Rotalex: comparison with electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay.
  1. R B Moosai,
  2. R Alcock,
  3. T M Bell,
  4. F R Laidler,
  5. J S Peiris,
  6. A P Wyn-Jones,
  7. C R Madeley

    Abstract

    A commercially available latex agglutination test, Rotalex (Orion Diagnostics, Finland), for detecting rotaviruses was evaluated in comparison with four other tests (electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay) routinely used in our laboratories. Although Rotalex was the least complex method, it showed lack of specificity and sensitivity when carried out according to the manufacturer's instructions. Four basic modifications of Rotalex are described. These include the use of Hank's balanced salt solution, increasing the incubation time to 20 min, reading the agglutination result by an experienced observer, and the use of 50 mm square glass plates. The modified procedure gave results which were comparable with those obtained by electron microscopy, immunofluorescence, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The latter techniques, when used to detect rotavirus, all gave similar results.

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