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Isolated endogenous endophthalmitis secondary to Nocardia spp in an immunocompetent adult
  1. T de Silva1,
  2. C Evans1,
  3. H S Mudhar2,
  4. I Rennie3,
  5. S T Green4
  1. 1Department of Infection and Tropical Medicine, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  2. 2Department of Histopathology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  3. 3Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  4. 4Department of Infection and Tropical Medicine, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    T de Silva
    Department of Infection and Tropical Medicine, E floor, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK; thushan.desilva{at}sth.nhs.uk

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Nocardia spp cause opportunist pulmonary, cerebral or soft-tissue infections and exogenous endophthalmitis. Endogenous endophthalmitis is rare, occurring as the result of haematogenous dissemination, and in association with underlying immunodeficiency. We present the case of a patient with endogenous nocardial endophthalmitis, diagnosed by histopathological characteristics on subretinal biopsy, in an immunocompetent host with no evidence of extraocular infection.

A 49-year-old man presented with a 9-day history of worsening vision and ophthalmic pain. A left-sided choroidal mass was visualised on funduscopy. The patient refused admission and returned 3 days later with retinal detachment and no perception of light in his left eye. No history of ocular trauma or surgery was seen. He had injected intravenous drugs …

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