Article Text

PDF
Rapid blood separation is superior to fluoride for preventing in vitro reductions in measured blood glucose concentration
  1. R Z Shi,
  2. E S Seeley,
  3. R Bowen,
  4. J D Faix
  1. Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA
  1. Run Zhang Shi, Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA; rzshi{at}stanford.edu

Abstract

Aims: To determine whether tubes containing sodium fluoride negatively bias blood glucose concentration by directly comparing glucose concentrations in paired blood samples collected in tubes containing lithium heparin (Li-Heparin) and tubes containing sodium fluoride/potassium oxalate (NaF-KOx).

Methods: Paired blood samples from a group of patients (n = 1040) were collected in tubes containing Li-Heparin and tubes containing NaF-KOx at the same time. All Li-Heparin samples were centrifuged soon after collection and were kept cool in transport along with NaF-KOx samples, which were centrifuged at the receiving location after an average transport time of 4 h, but immediately before analysis. Glucose concentrations in the paired samples were determined simultaneously by an automated oxidase method.

Results: The mean glucose concentrations for NaF-KOx samples and Li-Heparin samples were 5.7 mmol/l and 6.1 mmol/l, respectively, with a mean difference of 0.39 mmol/l.

Conclusion: Rapid separation of heparinised blood is superior to fluoride alone for abrogating glycolytic effects on blood glucose measurements in the clinical laboratory.

Statistics from Altmetric.com

Footnotes

  • Competing interests: None.

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.