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Correspondence
Is there a relationship between familial adenomatous polyposis and focal nodular hyperplasia?
  1. Erdal Birol Bostanci1,
  2. Kerem Karaman1,
  3. Tahsin Dalgic1,
  4. Mevlut Kurt2,
  5. Tulay Temucin Keklik3,
  6. Musa Akoglu1
  1. 1Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
  2. 2Department of Gastroenterology, Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
  3. 3Department of Pathology, Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
  1. Correspondence to Dr Mevlut Kurt, Turkiye Yuksek Ihtisas Teaching and Research Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology, Kizilay Sk. No:2, TR-06100, Sihhiye, Ankara, Turkey; dr.mevlutkurt{at}gmail.com

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Focal nodular hyperplasia (FNH) is the second most common benign neoplasm of the liver after haemangioma. It occurs predominantly in women of child-bearing age (female/male, 8/1–12/1). The lesions are often multiple and usually involve the right liver lobe. Although the aetiopathogenesis of FNH is not clear, it has recently been thought to be a non-neoplastic, hyperplastic response to a congenital vascular malformation. The role of oral contraceptive use has long been discussed, but today most investigators agree that the use of oral contraception does not induce the formation of FNH, but may increase the size of the nodules. FNH is also related to well-known vascular diseases, such as the hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu–Osler–Weber disease) and the congenital absence of the portal vein.1 However, there is still no known association between FNH and familial adenomatous …

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