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J Clin Pathol 67:182-186 doi:10.1136/jclinpath-2013-201804
  • Short report

Cystic apocrine hyperplasia is the most common finding in MRI detected breast lesions

  1. Syed A Hoda1
  1. 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Paula S Ginter, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 525 East 68th Street, Starr 1036, New York, NY 10065, USA; psg9003{at}nyp.org
  • Received 11 June 2013
  • Revised 23 August 2013
  • Accepted 8 September 2013
  • Published Online First 22 October 2013

Abstract

MRI of the breast is an increasingly employed modality for breast imaging due to its relatively high sensitivity for the detection of breast carcinoma. Cumulative data indicate that MRI of the breast has relatively higher sensitivity, but lower specificity than mammography. However, data regarding the diagnostic yield for particular types of breast lesions detected via breast MRI remain scant. Over a 3.5-year period, we evaluated histological findings of 192 needle core biopsies of MRI detected breast lesions. In this series, the positive predictive value of MRI detected lesions for breast carcinoma was 20%. Invasive carcinoma was diagnosed in 16/192 (8%) and in situ carcinoma in 22/192 (11%). The most commonly detected histological finding was cystic apocrine hyperplasia (19%), a benign entity.