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Chondroblastoma: clinicopathological analyses of 307 cases from a single institution in China and the diagnostic value of the H3F3 K36M mutant antibody
  1. Qianqian Zhao1,
  2. Juan Tang1,
  3. Yanli Luo1,
  4. Jin Huang1,
  5. Dingjun Hu2,
  6. Jinyu Zhu2,
  7. Ting Jiang1,
  8. Huizhen Zhang1,
  9. Zhiyan Liu1
  1. 1Department of Pathology, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  2. 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  1. Correspondence to Professor Zhiyan Liu, Department of Pathology, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Shanghai 200233, China; zhiyanliu{at}shsmu.edu.cn; Professor Huizhen Zhang, Department of Pathology, Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, Shanghai 200233, China; liuyuanblz{at}alinyun.com

Abstract

Aims To elucidate the clinicopathological features and the diagnostic value of mutation specific antibody H3F3 K36M of chondroblastoma (CB) in China.

Methods Clinicopathological profiles were retrieved, and immunohistochemistry was performed on 185 CB specimens and the control group.

Results Our series included 307 patients with a mean age of 22.1 years. Long tubular bones (63.8%, 196/307) were most commonly involved, followed by short bones of the hands and feet (22.1%, 68/307), sesamoid bones (8.1%, 25/307), flat bones and irregular bones (5.9%, 18/307). The most commonly involved site was the proximal femur, followed by distal femur, proximal humerus and calcaneus. The average age in the long bones group (20.3 years) was significantly younger than the short bones group (24.9 years) (p<0.001), sesamoid bones group (24.4 years) (p=0.02) and flat bones and irregular bones group (29.1 years) (p<0.001). Microscopically, aneurysmal bone cyst-like change (63.6%, 117/184), necrosis (43.5%, 80/184) and chicken-wire calcification (26.1%, 48/184) were variably noted. In rare cases, cortical destruction, soft tissue and lymphovascular invasion were identified. Positive immunoreaction with H3F3 K36M was examined in all non-decalcified, all EDTA decalcified, 87.1% hydrochloric acid (HCl) decalcified CB samples and the high-grade sarcoma secondary to CB, but not the control group.

Conclusions CB usually involves the long tubular bones in younger age group. H3F3 K36M can identify K36M mutation with 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity in non-decalcified and EDTA decalcified samples, more than 80% sensitivity in HCl decalcified samples. Virtually, all CBs harbour an H3K36M mutation.

  • Bone Neoplasms
  • IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY
  • Pathology, Surgical
  • Morphological and Microscopic Findings

Data availability statement

The data presented in this study are available on request from the corresponding author.

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Data availability statement

The data presented in this study are available on request from the corresponding author.

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Footnotes

  • Handling editor Vikram Deshpande.

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  • Contributors HZ contributed to the research study design. ZL supervised the project and revised the manuscript. ZL accepts full responsibility for the work and/or the conduct of the study, had access to the data, and controlled the decision to publish. QZ wrote the manuscript. JT, YL, JH performed data analysis and statistical analysis. DH, JZ and TJ collated the data. All authors critically reviewed and approved the final version of the manuscript.

  • Funding This research was funded by National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 81972500), Grant from Innovation Program of STCSM (Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality) (Grant No. 20Z11900304) and Clinical research funds from Shanghai Sixth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine (Grant No. ynlc201727).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; externally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.