eLetters

39 e-Letters

published between 2001 and 2004

  • Statin precipitated lactic acidosis: A very big question mark
    Peter S Kruger

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the report on postulated atorvastatin induced lactic acidosis [1]. In our view, the arguments outlined by its authors do not support this hypothesis at all, for the reasons outlined below:

    a) The patient clearly had a mixed acid-base disturbance (combined respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis, as evidenced by the normal pH of 7.39 coupled with severe hypocapnia)....

    Show More
  • Re: Chronic fatigue syndrome and immune dysfunction : cause or effect?
    Gwen Kennedy

    Dear Editor

    In his letter of the letter 18th August 2004, Dr Chandler makes some interesting comments on our paper “Increased neutrophil apoptosis in chronic fatigue syndrome” [1]. He states that “a more likely explanation for the group's findings are that CFS patients have a primary psychological disorder with the secondary expected immune dysfunction”. We strongly disagree with this statement.

    It is n...

    Show More
  • Re: Chronic fatigue syndrome and immune dysfunction : cause or effect?
    Angela D Flack

    Dear Editor

    I welcome the latest research on neutrophil apoptosis from a educated, experienced, and motivated M.E. expert.

    I am very concerned, and thoroughly disappointed again, that, despite the concerns raised, by hundreds of well educated people, involved with M.E. worldwide, for many years, someone who ha...

    Show More
  • More Immunological profiling needed
    Nicholas J McAdden

    Dear Editor

    It is disappointing to read Ian Chandler's comments on this work. Dr Chandler's rather simplified logic seems to work like this:

    - Depression is a psychiatric illness.

    - Immunological abnormalities can be found in depression.

    - CFS is also a psychiatric disorder and so there is no point in measuring immunological parameters because any findings will be redundant.

    ...

    Show More
  • Re: Chronic fatigue syndrome and immune dysfunction : cause or effect?
    Paul Schaafsma

    Dear Editor

    Ian Chandler's response to this study, insisting that any immune abnormality is secondary to depression is without scientific merit.

    Several studies comparing ME/CFIDS patients with patients suffering from clinical depression have found important physical differences. SPECT brain imaging studies sh...

    Show More
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome and immune dysfunction : cause or effect?
    IAN P CHANDLER

    Dear Editor

    Having read Kennedy et al's short report on finding increased neutrophil apoptosis in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, I am unable to agree with their conclusion that "these findings provide new evidence that patients with CFS have an underlying abnormality in their immune cells" [1]. They provide no evidence that the immune defect is causative, and, on the contrary, there is a wealth of...

    Show More
  • Controversial insights for lymphangiogenesis in breast cancer
    Fernando C. Schmitt

    Dear Editor

    Recently, we read with the interest the paper Lack of lymphangiogenesis during breast carcinogenesis from Vleugel et al. (J Clin Pathol.2004; 57: 746-751) [1]. These authors investigated the role of lymphangiogenesis in breast carcinogenesis. Whist the resident lymphatics and/or new tumour-induced lymphatic vessels are collapsed by the intra- tumoral pressure, or if they do facilitate the neopl...

    Show More
  • Value of Specimen Mammography
    Obi C Iwuagwu

    Dear Editor

    I read with interest the recent article by Cook et al. and do agree that examination of breast reduction specimen is beneficial since incidental malignancy/high risk lesions are well documented.The problem has often been one of examination of relatively large breast reduction specimens with attendant time and resource constraints, often requiring random sampling.

    Specimen mammography (...

    Show More
  • A study of public opinion on the use of tissue samples from living subjects for clinical research
    Peter Furness

    Dear Editor

    The paper by Goodson and Vernon on public opinions of tissue sample use,[1] contains a fundamental flaw which, unless I am mistaken, ought to have prevented its publication.

    It is generally accepted that post mortem tissue has much greater emotional significance than samples of human tissue removed from living patients. This is supported by a survey of public opinion conducted by the MRC a...

    Show More
  • The rise of the dangerous cult of splenic preservation
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor

    The fear of overwhelming infection following splenectomy has had a profound and detremental effect upon the recent evolution of surgical practice. Extraordinary efforts to save the spleen are now the rule usually in the hands of trainees and inexperienced or inadequately trained surgeons. The methods include splenic repair, partial splenectomy, wrapping the spleen in a Dexon mesh, non-operative manageme...

    Show More

Pages