eLetters

70 e-Letters

published between 2003 and 2006

  • The value of total IgE levels in the context of specific allergy
    Desa Lilic

    Dear Editor,

    Our best practice guidelines for the diagnosis of allergy advise that routine requesting of total IgE measurements is not necessary; instead we advise requesting allergen-specific IgE based on clinical findings. Khan et al. argue that measurement of total IgE levels permits ascertainment of possible false-negative or false-positive specific IgE results. However, the examples given provide only a circum...

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  • Thrombophilia screens
    David M Keeling

    Dear Editor,

    It was interesting to read the audit of thrombophilia screens [1]. It was however stated that "Only 11 of the 47 laboratories surveyed routinely carried out a total protein S assay" and "The BCSH guidelines suggest that only the total protein S assay should be used as a screening test, and if this is abnormal, then a free protein S assay should be performed”. In fact the guideline [2] does not recommend...

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  • The value of total IgE levels in the context of specific allergy
    Sujoy Khan

    Dear Editor,

    The article by WS Smellie and colleagues[1] recommends not requesting total IgE levels when requesting allergen specific IgE. We agree that total IgE on its own neither rules in nor rules out the diagnosis of allergy. However, total IgE levels are useful in the interpretation of specific IgE tests, because they permit the ascertainment of possible false-negative or false-positive results. Although thi...

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  • HIF-1 and cellular fate
    Richard G Fiddian-Green

    Dear Editor,

    The authors of this paper observe that, "The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic....During hypoxia, an intricate balance exists between factors that induce or counteract apoptosis, or even stimulate proliferation".[1]

    ...
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  • Seasonal variation in mortality from myocardial infarction and haemopericardium: a postmortem study
    Richard M Jones

    Dear Editor,

    I read with interest the recent article by Biedrzycki and Baithun[1] investigating the relationship between myocardial infarction complicated by haemopericardium, and season. The study utilised data collected during Coronial postmortem examinations, carried out over a 5-year period in East London. They concluded that there was indeed a ‘seasonal variation’ for this entity, and that the likelihood of ven...

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  • Specialist Registrar
    Runjan Chetty

    Dr Tandon: You should contact the RCPath directly and get a ruling pertinent to your qualifications and experience.

    Professor Runjan Chetty
    Editor, The Journal of Clinical Pathology

  • SpR in histopathology
    Nidhi Tandon

    Dear Editor,

    I gather from the article that an overseas graduate with an experience in Pathology can directly apply for SpR post, but the rcpath website says it is not so for histopathology. I would like to know if an overseas graduate with an experience in Pathology equivalent to the award of CCST can directly get into SpR post?

  • Re: Dangers of Bouin's Fixation.
    Vijayalakshmi Ananthanarayanan

    Dear Editor

    In a previous issue of this journal, we presented problems of using Bouin’s fixative for immunohistochemical and nuclear morphometric assays on prostatic biopsies(1). We agree with the important comment offered by Berney that Bouin’s fixative could increase the sensitivity for detection of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN) and prostate cancer. Furthermore, we agree that increa...

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  • Negative images of mycobacteria
    Debdatta Basu

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the article by Dunn et al.[1] We have reported unstained rod-shaped images of mycobacteria in Romanowsky-stained aspirate smears of lymphnodes and bone marrow in patients with AIDS.[2,3] These were subsequently confirmed to be acid-fast bacilli with Ziehl- Neelsen stain. We referred to them as ‘negative images’. Maygarden and Flanders first reported negative images of mycobacteria...

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  • Rickettsial antibody levels and mitochondrial gene expression in CFS patients
    Geoffrey C Kemp

    Dear Editor,

    Kaushik et al.[1] have demonstrated significantly different gene expression in a small sample of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. They suggest these observations are consistent with a complex pathogenesis involving T cell activation and abnormalities of neuronal and mitochondrial function, possibly as a result of virus infection or organophosphate exposures.

    We suggest that chronic rick...

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