eLetters

157 e-Letters

  • Osseous metaplasia in colonic adenomas
    Alberto Cavazza

    Dear Editor,

    We read with interest the recent report of osseous metaplasia in a tubular adenoma of the colon by Al-Daraji et al. [1]. In 1996, one of us reported the same phenomenon in a 1 cm tubulovillous adenoma 25 cm from the anus [2]. Since our paper (not cited by Al-Daraji et al. [1]), we had the opportunity to see a second example of osseous metaplasia in a 2.6 cm tubulovillous adenoma with moderate dyspla...

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  • Nasal Swabs
    Teresa Will

    Could you state the recommended method of collecting swabs for RSV? From your brief synopsis, I gathered that the anterior nares only was swabbed for culture and was found to be effective and less painful. Is that correct?

    Terrie Will

  • cytoplasmatic fragments which causes spurious platelet counts
    wim van der meer

    Dear Editor,

    With great interest we have read the article of Kakkar & Garg [1]. They mentioned the presence of cytoplasmic fragments or so called pseudoplatelets that may interfere with the platelet count when using automated haematology analysers. In 2003 we reported the presence of pseudoplatelets in a number of patients, which causes spurious platelet counts to such an extent that the risk of serious ble...

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  • Author's reply to Parr et al.
    Antonio Alonso

    Dear Editor,

    Setting up standards when interpreting mtDNA CR sequence data from tumors.

    We agree with Parr et al.[1] on the importance to compare the mtDNA sequence data of our recent case report [2] (a divergence of 7 homoplasmic nucleotide positions within the 16024-16365 segment of the HV1 region between two morphologically different tissue sections found on the same slide) with the available...

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  • MtDNA haplotyping of pathology specimens
    Ryan L. Parr

    Dear Editor

    Alonso et al [1] recommend the use of mitochondrial genetic typing to exclude the possibility of tissue carryover artifacts in situations where low DNA content and high degradation may compromise conventional short tandem repeat typing. They studied archived presurgical hematoxylin and eosin stained needle biopsy sections from the same slide to ascertain the authentic source of the malignant and...

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  • Response to Dr Kruger
    Tim M Reynolds

    Dear Editor

    In response to Dr Kruger, we provide extra minor details that had been omitted for reasons of word count.

    • As described, dyspnoea had been present and worsening for 6 weeks. The blood gas results cited were from 5 days after the date of hospital admission but were not significantly different from gases taken on 2 earlier occasions during the admission. The results cited were the ones tha...
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  • Fatal pulmonary emboli in hospitalised patients: a necropsy review
    Jonathan R. Salisbury

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the recent article by Alikhan et al , in which they reviewed necropsy reports to find out the number of deaths due to fatal pulmonary embolism in hospitalised patients.[1] There seem to be a number of confusions in this paper.

    1. Acute infection was the most common medical illness found in patients who had died from pulmonary embolism, in particular respiratory in...

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  • Chemosensitivity testing
    Gregory D Pawelski

    Dear Editor

    When a patient has an infection, doctors often send a sample of infected blood or tissue to a lab where they can grow the bacteria and see which antibiotics are most effective (called Bacterial Culture and Sensitivity Testing). Chemosensitivity testing is an attempt to do something similar for cancer; fresh samples of the patient's tumor from surgery or a biopsy are grown in test tubes and tested wit...

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  • Statin precipitated lactic acidosis: A very big question mark
    Peter S Kruger

    Dear Editor

    We read with interest the report on postulated atorvastatin induced lactic acidosis [1]. In our view, the arguments outlined by its authors do not support this hypothesis at all, for the reasons outlined below:

    a) The patient clearly had a mixed acid-base disturbance (combined respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis, as evidenced by the normal pH of 7.39 coupled with severe hypocapnia)....

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  • Re: Chronic fatigue syndrome and immune dysfunction : cause or effect?
    Gwen Kennedy

    Dear Editor

    In his letter of the letter 18th August 2004, Dr Chandler makes some interesting comments on our paper “Increased neutrophil apoptosis in chronic fatigue syndrome” [1]. He states that “a more likely explanation for the group's findings are that CFS patients have a primary psychological disorder with the secondary expected immune dysfunction”. We strongly disagree with this statement.

    It is n...

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